First Chinese Buddhist Pilgrim Fa Hsien (340-420) To Make A Successful Journey to India

Fa Hsien (Fa Xian) started his  journey to India in 399 along with fellow Buddhist pilgrims Hui Ching, Tao Cheng, Hui Ying, Hui Wei, and others, all of them pledged to a common purpose, determined to journey to India and seek the rules of discipline or the Vinaya Pitaka, the regulatory framework governing the monastic order. Their journey began at Chang-an the ancient capital, in modern Xian. Shaanxi Province.

It is estimated that Fa Hsien was about 60 years old and the journey took a total of 14 years before arriving back in China victorious. The party proceeded westward across the Taklamakan Desert, crossed the steep slopes of the Pamirs, and then, after negotiating the so-called Hanging Passage-a series of scaffolding and suspension bridges through the otherwise impassable  gorges of the upper Indus river - the party  at last made their way into northern India, which took six years. The party after having spent 3 winter months near what is modern Jalalabad, proceeded to make their way south over the snowy slopes of Sefid-Kuh range when they encountered fierce blasts of icy wind and the party was rendered speechless with terror and exhaustion.

The scene begins here:

Suddenly one member of the group, Hui Ching, began frothing at the mouth and announced that he could not go any farther, begging the others to press on without him. He died in the arms of Fa Hsien, hugging him and weeping bitterly, lamented the fate that had not permitted the monk to live until he reached the homeland of the Buddha.

This kind of scene must have occurred with tragic frequency during the arduous pilgrimages made by Chinese monks to Central Asia and India. Buddharts call for this commission to be of the highest quality work of great historical significance for generations to come in honor of their sacrifices that they made in order that Buddhism might become a great humanistic world religion.  

Please submit proposal with a description of the scene, including the dimension and medium to buddharts.info@gmail.com. A sketch of the scene will be extremely helpful.